Gilbert Markham in The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Bronte- My essay

Gilbert Markham as a Predatory Male in The Tenant of Wildfell Hall

At the end of The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, readers mostly see it as a triumph of love and matrimony; where a bad husband dies and a better man takes his place in the woman’s life. However, through close speculation, one can see that men in the novel are different but equally terrible as husbands and heroes. Instances of adultery, violence, dominance, stalking and emotional abuse are projected by both men, leaving Markham as no obvious hero. Where some people believe Gilbert Markham is a hero to Helen Huntingdon, this essay asserts that Gilbert Markham is actually a predator of Helen Huntingdon, the prey, and therefore an untrustworthy narrator. Through clear events in the novel as evidence, it can be argued that Markham is as much a predator as Helen’s husband, Arthur Huntingdon. Markham is no hero, only a jealous hunter.

Although there is more than one instance of preying by several different male characters, Gilbert Markham starts off as the first encounter. It begins as Markham finds a fascination within Helen while he is presumably dating Eliza Millward. Throughout the next few chapters, he continues to explain the feelings he has towards both women and how he feels that he doesn’t need to decide between them at this time. Being the first clue of Markham’s domineering temperament, readers discover the narrator as a typical nineteenth century male main character. “That story is circumvented at the outset with Helen Graham’s ambiguous status as widow/wife, and yet the pressure of that traditional narrative is such, and the cultural expectations for beautiful women are such, that Gilbert’s story strives to become that narrative as her falls out of love with Eliza Millward and into love with Helen Graham and begins to write himself into the narrative as the rescuing figure of the maligned and misunderstood lady,” (Langland 37). Clearly Markham has created a game of love versus socialism versus selfishness as he mentions his love for these two women. Having barely met Helen, he already loves her, but has loved Eliza for a while before the story began- proving evidence towards his womanizing behavior with no good intentions towards either of the women. Perhaps the display of affections declared by our narrator seem as plenty of evidence towards the love scheme, however, as Markham being the narrator, readers are forced to look at the story from a step back to understand Markham’s real purpose in the story, to enhance the aspect of male dominance and violence. Markham is displaying the selfishness he has towards his belief that he can and should have any woman that he wants. His word play and continuous display of affection in his narration speak in the voice of domineering masculinity and not of a sensitive or emotionally-confused male character.

As the story continues, Markham continues his charade of heroism and violently attacks the man who is rumored to be the father of little Author, Helen’s son. Later, it becomes known that Fredrick Lawrence is Helen’s brother, keeping her safe as she escaped from her husband, posing no threat to Helen or Markham. Markham’s fall into gossip and his violent altercation towards Lawrence provide readers with indifference to the narrative as heroism and more as an obsession. Not only does Markham harm Helen’s beloved brother, but he also doesn’t tell anyone the truth about it, even after he finds out who Lawrence was to Helen. Only in the end does Markham apologize and visit Lawrence when he had become ill after the altercation, which may not even be the truth as this is a letter to his brother in-law and not a trustworthy narration. It seems that Markham’s purpose was to steer away any threat there would be towards Helen, but Markham himself felt threatened by the other male figure in Helen’s life. In this instance, Markham has clearly proven that he is a violent and jealous person and has no true intentions to protect Helen. With Eliza still in the picture, and Helen being only Markham’s friend, Markham has played off his domineering intentions of womanizing these ladies to let Lawrence know that he in fact can do so by attacking and threatening him. Langdon argues, “Although Gilbert Markham pretends to disregard the storm of rumor surrounding Helen Graham that the community circulates his behavior reveals that he accords rumor great authority. When he adds what he calls (the evidence of my senses,) he feels his position is unassailable just at the point where it is most vulnerable. We, as readers, appreciate the limitation of Gilbert’s perspective, the ways he, in focalizing events and other events, has generated a cloud of misapprehension shaped by his own needs, fears, and desires,” (Langdon 38, 39). On the contrary, Markham’s perspective for this event is greatly deceiving and not at all appreciated. His attitude for Lawrence and for his own actions adds fair evidence towards his disapproving agenda against other characters in the novel. By Markham explaining his feelings of the attack mediocrely, he becomes an unreliable narrator to the controversial narrative, as if he is purposely deceiving the readers to make himself look relatable. By cheating the reader of realistic experiences, Markham has become completely untrustworthy for telling the events later to occur.

Also, Markham’s deceiving perspective isn’t his way of covering up such wonderful and sensitive feelings he has towards the story at all, it is to make himself look better in the eyes of the readers and his brother in-law, and possibly his own. His needs, fears and desires are none to be appreciated by the reader, being why Markham left them out of his letter all together. Markham’s implied feelings may seem respectable to those who by the end of the story believe he has good intentions for Helen, however, it is clear by the following events that he is not the gentleman our heroine is seeking, which who we understood to be her brother, Lawrence. Although not a romantic relationship, readers understand that Lawrence was what Helen needed at this time in her life, and it was he who she had chosen to stay with, no romantic relationship needed. Perhaps, if this would have been the narration of Helen’s, readers would have understood this to be the reason why Helen chose to stay away from Markham and not conceive a relationship with him right away. In Markham’s narration, he explains it to be because of her hurtful husband that Helen can’t be with him, at least until Huntington dies and Helen is a widow. Following Huntington’s death, Helen still decides to stay away from a romantic relationship with Markham until the last chapter of the novel. Perhaps Helen’s decision has nothing to do with needing time to grieve over her dead husband, like Markham implies, but for any other reason why she might want to wait. Helen, as our heroine protagonist, has the right to be completely in the dark with the readers about her intentions with Markham, being he has his readers assuming her intentions with no real evidence of his own. Point being, Markham is no confiding narrator in telling the perspective of any character in the novel.

Plainly, readers are expecting for all characters to reach an acceptable moral standard by the conclusion of the novel to make for a compelling story, but the characters do not reach this expectation. Harrison and Stanford assert that “The method Anne chose by which to present this sphere of internal activity and change is that of introspective narration- a ‘first person singular’ confession or recital. It is the means by which her character confess, explain and justify their lives and it is also a discipline through which they arrive at a state of fuller self-awareness- at a knowledge of existence and their own nature, and how these may best come to terms… We do not discover, then, in her pages any of those brilliantly iridescent studies of character-structure in decay; but find, rather, character in the act of growth; in the act. We may say, of becoming itself; of becoming responsible, moral, and adult; of being weaned from illusion and dream and adapting itself to reality,” (Harrison and Stanford 231). Some readers think that being Helen’s hero and marrying her was Markham’s ceiling of fulfillment, however, it can be argued that Markham doesn’t reach his full potential at all. Hallenback explains, “When he announces to Halford, his brother-in-law and correspondent, that his letter will be an “old world story,” too, he is suggesting a past that no longer exists, representative perhaps of his transformation. The “new” world in which Gilbert lives in 1847, by implication, is one in which the question of Gilbert’s gentlemanly status has been answered affirmatively,” (Hallenback 6). Arguably, Markham’s story of old news is not any old news to the readers or his brother in-law, therefore leaving Markham with no true ability to call this story as that. Self-fulfillment of becoming a gentleman for his and Helen’s needs are still definitely not proven just by Markham’s description of it being old news. By marrying Helen, life has only added to Markham’s childish intentions because he got exactly what he wanted in the end and didn’t have to change his domineer to become a better man for the novel’s sake or Helen’s. Understandably, Helen has dealt with immature and dominating men since she married Huntington, and perhaps this is why she doesn’t demand better from Markham as her next husband, but this is not a real excuse for Markham. However, Markham’s domineer could still be viewed as respectable, but only in contrast to Helen’s diary explanations of her ex-husband.

As compared to Markham, Huntington committed similar acts by cheating on Helen inside their marriage. Huntington lied, cheated and dominated Helen completely throughout their marriage, showing greatly similar qualities that Markham already has. P. J. M. Scott writes, “The Tenant of Wildfell Hall works well as intended: a useful fable of warning of what may be the most frequent matrimonial mistake- that of one party to a marriage entering it, ill-advisedly out of a compulsive affection, with the intent of reforming or changing some major aspect of the other’s nature,” (Scott 90). This assertion could be talking about not only Helen’s marriage to Huntington but also to her romantic relationship and approaching marriage with Markham. Both men in the novel take rolls in events that could lead to assertions as this one, that one party is deceiving the other. However, as for one party changing the other, in the case of Helen and Markham it is perhaps within both parties. Nash and Suess explain, “Another obstacle, making it difficult for the reader to judge whether Markham would be a fitting husband for Helen, comes in the deliberate omission of helen’s point of view. Her very silence suggests that her views might not coincide with those of her husband,” (Nash and Suess 220). As this suggests, Markham’s complete use of only his narration and Helen’s direct diary entries is his way of silencing her point of view for the desire to leave the story as his rather impure interpretations of the truth. Perhaps Helen’s decision to stay away from Markham wasn’t so she could meet a certain quota of maturation, but was so that Markham might could. Some may say that only Huntington is the cheating and lying man that Helen encounters romantically if read only clearly through the narration of Markham’s, but by reading though the lines of Markham’s text readers can find Markham’s deceiving intentions to over-through all boundaries of a gentleman to get exactly what he wants, Helen, as did Huntington. There are instances where Markham is directly and indirectly conniving Helen, such as when he harms her brother and doesn’t tell her the truth and when she leaves and asks him to leave her be but he frequently visits her brother only to learn what she is doing. These instances prove that Markham is doing just as Huntington, lying and conniving Helen of the truth, but in a lesser degree of harm, therefore; even though Helen did marry Markham in the end of the novel, perhaps she did so after it being made clear that Markham was of no great degree more mature than he was ever going to achieve.

Markham’s loving and caring words in his narration could lead readers to believe he is being genuine, even though we know at this time that he is unreliable as a narrator. Perhaps if this story was told in Huntington’s perspective readers could see that even he presumably loved her, but through Helen’s diary readers see the truth that people wouldn’t see through Huntington’s perspective. Even though this is true, some readers still appreciate Markham’s narration, even when Helen’s would be more of use. Antonia Losano mentions “Juliet McMaster defends the diary by insisting that it is immediate rather than passive: the diary records Helen and Arthur’s relationship and its deterioration more powerfully than if Gilbert had recorded Helen’s verbal telling of the tale,” (Losano 19). Clearly, Gilbert has made himself untrustworthy even when telling this story in his letter. Helen’s intrusion into his personal letter proves that perhaps even Markham believes that by him telling Helen’s story himself would somehow make it untrue, and by Helen’s diary entry it’s as if Markham is trying to prove to himself and to his readers that he cannot be deceiving at this point in the story. Since Helen didn’t verbally tell Markham these facts but allowed him to read her diary, Markham can then quote what she has said, as if it is proof to his brother in-law that he is indeed not lying. By this time in Markham’s life he is untrustworthy, even to himself, to tell stories truthfully, being why every event in this letter (besides Helen’s diary entries) he tells lightly and with no detectable meaning except for his great intentions of saving Helen and Arthur, when he might otherwise tell the story in full truth if he was already a believable person. If Markham had told Helen’s perspective without the diary entries, it can be assumed that he would have somehow depicted certain events and falsified the entire purpose of the inclusion to begin with. Clearly, Markham liked what Helen had to add to his letter and therefore quoted it to add at least some truthfulness to his letter and his conscience. Losano again states interesting information pertaining to Markham’s infidelity: “Elizabeth Signorotti offers a caution to Langland and other critics who see Helen’s diary as liberatory: she suggests that Gilbert’s use of Helen’s diary within his letter to his brother-in law is Bronte’s way of dramatizing male control over Helen. Signorotti notes Gilbert’s duplicity throughout the novel and lays out very compelling reasons why Gilbert is not the noble hero that he pretends to be,” (Losano 21). It is evident for several critics that Markham is untrustworthy as a narrator and his purpose being is to convey a story of male dominance and male interpretation in nineteenth-century literature, and as being such, the narrator is a protagonist coinciding with Huntington.

With the evidence at hand, readers and critics may see that Markham’s presumably great intentions as a narrator, a hero and a romantic partner are all deceiving expectations made in the beginning of the novel. Throughout the story readers expect the narrator to tell a story of triumph to antagonists and added greatness to the loved protagonists; however, in the story of Markham and Helen, readers are disappointed in the events that seem favorable to the goodness of the story but can be seen through a light of delusion and deceptiveness as a creation of a protagonist unfolds. Through clear speculation, it is evident that Gilbert Markham is of no hero to Helen, but of a better of the worst two men that she has encountered. As Nash and Suess clarify, “Reaction to Markham is best termed ambivalent, as he is perceived as perfectly innocuous, on the one hand, and as inexplicably violent on the other. Such a curious combination of characteristics is central to the relationship that the author develops between the lovers…Bronte reveals the passionate aspects of Markham’s character which she combines with his pride and petulance to exploit the paradoxical qualities of human nature and, thus, to create a believable portrait,” (Nash and Suess 217). Spoken plainly, Markham becomes believable only through the need of a clear story, and not for the purposes of the truth for the sake of other perspectives.

For the Kids

I recently read the first book to a series I loved reading as a child. Even though the 80 page book was a quick luxury, I don’t think I will be continuing the series. If you ever want to relive a story you thought was wonderful in your childhood, remember that you have (or should have) matured as a person and as a reader. Lemony Snicket is an amazing author and The Series of Unfortunate Events: The Bad Beginning is a great book. However, he makes it very obvious it is a series for a young crowd. And this is a good thing. Most children don’t understand the same things and don’t read on the same level that adults do. Therefore, there does need to be books directed towards only children.

I think children’s books writers are incredibly talented because they have the ability to go back to when they were children and think about what was interesting at that point and what words or phrases were understandable. I really liked Snicket’s in-text definitions and examples  of  words that might be a little hard to understand the meaning of for his young audience. To me as an adult reader I thought it made the story more relate-able, so it must really help kids get into the story. I think a big reason why people are discouraged as children to read books and later in life don’t enjoy them is because they couldn’t understand what authors were trying to tell them. Some may think children’s books writers may have the easiest job in the writing industry, but I think it is the most important one to creating a reading audience. Even though there are exceptions to this case, children are the future; and if children hate to read then what is the future for authors?
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The Better Goodreads

I have been asked to talk about a new app that I think would be useful to my blog topic. Something useful would be a website where readers and writers go to start conversations about what they are reading and what kind of books and topics interest them. Something similar to Goodreads, but not exactly.

Readers need to be able to post more than “What I am reading” and reviews after they have finished it. This new website/app needs to have actual statuses posted from the readers about what they are currently thinking about the book instead of an afterwards overall review of the book. If readers had the chance to post statuses and comments to other statuses, more thoughts and opinions would be flowing through the media versus a review that you have to recall information about the story. I also think it would be cool if you could post your 5 star ratings anytime and several times throughout the book. That way people can see where the book gets good and where it downfalls (if so).

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For bloggers like myself, viewing conversations about what people are reading and what topics are trending would help decide what to read and what to potentially blog about. To gain an audience, I have to talk about things that people want to read, this just seems like the best way to learn information about people today and get people’s attention.

Now that I am writing this, I really hope a computer geek is reading this and does create this website. This app wouldn’t only help me, it would be a great social media website for anybody. It would be a great way to be involved in conversations that are interesting to you and will help you with your next book decision.

Until next time.

Wanna read something different?

 

A few months ago I started a book that is way different than what I usually would have picked up. And The Mountains Echoed by Khaled Hosseini is a book I can’t quite explain  what it is about, because I know whatever I say it will not explain the entire plot and all of Hosseini’s points of writing it.

“Broad in scope and setting, wise and compassionate in its storytelling. And the Mountains Echoed is a profoundly moving, captivating novel that demonstrates Khaled Hosseini’s deeply felt understanding of the bonds that define us and shape our lives-and of what it means to be human.”

This part of the synopsis found on the cover of the book is a wonderful way to explain this novel. I wonder if what this person gathered about the book is what Hosseini would have said himself. Can anyone really explain what the author feels just by reading the book he wrote? I don’t think so.

Anyways, I decided to read this book because it is different then the usual love story or teen fiction books I like to read. It’s about a family from the middle east and talks about the journey they live together, and the journey they live without each other. When I first started this book two months ago (I really hate that it is taking me so long to read this) it was really hard for me to understand where the book was going and I think that’s what I like most about it now. Hosseini keeps the reader guessing with the change of perspective between characters and completely different story that all the characters have to tell, and all it does is make you want to read it more. Each new book I read continues to prove my point that writing truly is an art, an art that I hardly think I will ever get tired of.

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Reading this book has made me confident to go outside my comfort zone with the books I read and try something new, and it makes me to encourage other readers to do the same. Just because a book is different definitely doesn’t mean it’s author doesn’t share the same talent and writing style that you have always enjoyed.

So try something new!

 

He is Quite a Character

I suppose I need to discuss Augustus Waters. I think most of you know who this person is by now.  He is the love story that all of us want to have. He’s not cheesy, but romantic. He’s dynamic, but simple. All of us fall in love with Augustus right along with Hazel Grace.

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The Fault in Our Stars is one of those stories that breaks your heart into a million pieces, but makes you feel like you have be reborn after you turn that last page. A person that doesn’t read wouldn’t understand what this means. It is truly spectacular how the writer can do this to us readers. One has to think that the author is a cancer patient himself, and perhaps he is Augustus in this book. However, he isn’t. John Green has never had cancer and isn’t our friendly character after all. So how could he find the inspiration to write about what we read before our eyes?

Well many years ago I worked as a student chaplain at a children’s hospital, and I think it got lodged in my head then. The kids I met were funny and bright and angry and dark and just as human as anybody else. And I really wanted to try to capture that, I guess, and I felt that the stories that I was reading sort of oversimplified and sometimes even dehumanized them. And I think generally we have a habit of imagining the very sick or the dying as being kind of fundamentally other. I guess I wanted to argue for their humanity, their complete humanity.

So that was the initial inspiration.

That took 12 years. I was very intimidated by it.” -John Green

Quote citation: (read the full interview)   http://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2013/02/how-john-green-wrote-a-cancer-book-but-not-a-bullshit-cancer-book/273441/

Writer’s have a few talents that the average person do not, but the one that amazes me the most is the ability to view a situation (good or bad) and turn it into a piece of art. It is like taking a picture of an object and describing everything about it. A writer describes the situation and weaves his voice through the gaps.

If you are a parent and have read this I am sorry to say I do not know how to properly blog this book for you. First off I have to say that I would never recommend this book to my mother. I couldn’t put thoughts like that in her head, even though the book has one of the best stories I have read (not the best, I could never pick one single favorite story). I’m glad the writer didn’t emphasize too greatly on the parents’ pain in this book. I could never bare the thought of what these parents have to go through, and I think that’s one of the great things about this book that make it not like the others.

As Green says in his interview, he wanted to not oversimplify the characters in his book like he has witnessed in other stories that he has read. I think focusing on the parents after the death of Augustus would have oversimplified not his cancerous characters themselves but would have made it like any other book about this disease and its ability to destroy the worlds around it.

I have heard Hollywood wants to make a movie based on this book. I must say I really hope they don’t. I’m sure many can agree that Hollywood likes to take something great and completely kill it, but that is another post of its own. Please enjoy this great read before the movie comes out!

Until next time.

You read, for fun?

Well hello there,

Okay, I am here to blog about reading. No, I am not here to bore you to pieces.  I hope that I am not the only one out there that likes to read about people that don’t exist, people that do exist and people who could exist that do extraordinary things. To read is to look at the world through another point of view. Rather the book be fictional or a documentary the words you read are of the writer’s, and he was just nice enough to let you see what he is thinking. Or what he is dreaming. Or what he is hoping the world will become. Or what he is hoping never happens.

The thing about reading is, I could go on for pages about how the written word touches all of our lives everyday. Even if you aren’t into sitting on the couch for hours on end reading about someone who you will never meet. I assume that since you are reading this post that you do in fact like to read, so hopefully you feel exactly the same way I do about books and every other literary source that has been invented. The world is such an interesting place and it is meant to be seen with different opinions and points of views. However I am not by any means limiting it to only reading for the writer’s view of the world. There is so much you can examine about the reasons why people read that it could never be fully expressed just what reading and writing does for everyone. So let’s vaguely state it as entertaining and informational.

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What I want to bring to my viewers is great insight to what other people are thinking. I’m not the writer of the book you are reading I am the word spreader of the book you are reading. I want to explore what the writer is telling us and I want to see what other readers have come to think of it. My posts will be more than just book reviews. My viewers will see just what everyone thinks about E. L. James’ Fifty Shades of Grey and other booming books. I also want to explore with my viewers books and their movies, the history of books, children’s books, and even go into literature and poetry.

I will be creating a YouTube Channel to stream all my interviews for my questionnaires and I have also created a Pinterest board tied to my blog. I also have all my posts set up to publish to my Facebook wall and Twitter account. Anyone can definitely follow me on my other sites.

I hope my posts will spike a bigger interest for reading anything and everything for my viewers, because an unexamined world is not worth living in.