Prized Values in Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility

I wrote this essay after reading Sense and Sensibility for my Women in Literature class. I find the book astounding and appealing to what could be the growing minds of all women. Enjoy and comment!

 

Jane Austen as a moralist writes a hybrid novel that promotes conservative as well as progressive ideals that is Sense and Sensibility. The treasured motifs expressed that envelop these distinctions are financial affairs, social mobility, marriage of affection and family matters as they pertain to the theme of impulse versus virtue. Austen indicates a clear and purposeful observation of humanity in her terms of assessing necessary demeanors presented by the chief characters in the novel, Marianne and Elinor Dashwood, as innateness provides questioning to overall mental wealth towards ones being. Such proved by her literary formality and deep cultural reviews, Austen constituted a novel of mingled standards and principles through conventional and radical faculties, that point towards a movement of fulfilling outright humanly conditions.

The influence of financials and social importance are big applications to consider when criticizing a 19th century novel, especially one that is written by a female author. Individualism marks its territory over the heroines as both express sides of altruism and indulgence. As women are meant to marry for money, and have no rights to property or sense of humanly growth, a female author of a book such as this raises controversy to the thoughtfulness and integrity of the work, holding customs of high volume for Austen.

Conditions of humanity vary between gender, social class, societies, point in time and religious value; however, in Sense and Sensibility, Austen suggests an alternative and declaration of compare and contrast between valuing sense, which the character Elinor Dashwood represents, and valuing sensibility, which the character Marianne Dashwood represents. Thought and feeling are meant to be demoted for the promotion of set political rules based on a formulaic outline for a means of a complete use of human physical and financial growth, rather than psychological and virtuous growth.

Customs and enforced mannerisms socially acceptable by people whom are expected to meet certain gender and social class roles provide a foundation to personality traits and an everyday sense of purpose in past centuries and in centuries to come. Distinguishing between “sense” and “sensibility” disturbs the calamity of honoring such ancient roles that require very little use of either disposition. Austen depicts an importance in revealing this alternate margin of being that is emotion as adjacent to meaning for an established conduct of morality, opening herself up for ridicule.

Marriage as transaction rather than marriage between two loving hearts explores the social relations between men and women of the upper classes, depicting a flirtation of the line between socially acceptable and abomination in this 19th century novel. Marianne and Elinor are alike in that their feelings are deep and genuine, but both depict opposite accounts of theoretical questions about human nature and human conduct.

Marianne is modelled by the convention of feelings, particularly by her consumption of novels and romantic poetry. This leads to her notions of emotion, spontaneity, devotion and drama. The novel continues as Marianne is heart-broken by others and their insensibility, as if she is being punished for her conventions of virtue. On the “sense” side of the novel, Elinor is amply contrary to Marianne in her ways of falling in love with Edward. Elinor leads a life of caution, reason, restraint, and responsibility. This also clasps a sense of punishment toward the girl as she is also heart-broken, even as she acts as expected of such people during this time. Jane Austen brings out the precise kinds of the sensibility exhibited by Elinor and Marianne by her technique of matching them not only against one another but also against other female characters in the novel, as would be the reality in a normal story of two single women attempting to figure out life as we know it. This holds some contradiction to Austen’s intentions for this novel, but I understand it to be mockery of the values held by the 19th century social classes.

What’s more, as the Dashwood family is broke in physical currency, both daughters do get to marry men while getting to know them and grow a relationship with them first hand, alongside financial reasons being added to the mixed decision for them to marry. This may leave a question if the marriages were forced or naturally implicated for a dreamy and essential controversy. It can be argued that this is one of Austen’s examples of plain women that withhold sentiment that marry fairytale heroes, however, it’s a simulation of romance and realism, where the outcomes of the characters are predictable as the plot is simple and repetitive with the marriage concept. This being said, Austen doesn’t interpret these techniques for the sake of entertainment for a 21st century female reader, but for a loyalty to her values towards the achievement of complete humanly psychological principles. Argument holds this controversy true being that both women are honest and elicit to feelings (rather them being present or not), leaving inquiry as to why this dichotomy is being contrasted and questioned nevertheless.

There is no question as to how both women became advanced into triumphal civil arrangements; Marianne and Elinor cultivated features from one another to create the happy ending that is a parody pretenses of social norms for men and women. This is a possession of the novel that is to say that learning is a constituted function of humanity, as pertains to our reality, that has no room to be left unattained to. I understand this novel to occupy unclear sentiments in order for the reader to draw conclusions as what really is the means of humanity, as Austen provides an abundance of evidence that suggests it being sense, sensibility, or components of both.

 

Wanna read something different?

 

A few months ago I started a book that is way different than what I usually would have picked up. And The Mountains Echoed by Khaled Hosseini is a book I can’t quite explain  what it is about, because I know whatever I say it will not explain the entire plot and all of Hosseini’s points of writing it.

“Broad in scope and setting, wise and compassionate in its storytelling. And the Mountains Echoed is a profoundly moving, captivating novel that demonstrates Khaled Hosseini’s deeply felt understanding of the bonds that define us and shape our lives-and of what it means to be human.”

This part of the synopsis found on the cover of the book is a wonderful way to explain this novel. I wonder if what this person gathered about the book is what Hosseini would have said himself. Can anyone really explain what the author feels just by reading the book he wrote? I don’t think so.

Anyways, I decided to read this book because it is different then the usual love story or teen fiction books I like to read. It’s about a family from the middle east and talks about the journey they live together, and the journey they live without each other. When I first started this book two months ago (I really hate that it is taking me so long to read this) it was really hard for me to understand where the book was going and I think that’s what I like most about it now. Hosseini keeps the reader guessing with the change of perspective between characters and completely different story that all the characters have to tell, and all it does is make you want to read it more. Each new book I read continues to prove my point that writing truly is an art, an art that I hardly think I will ever get tired of.

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Reading this book has made me confident to go outside my comfort zone with the books I read and try something new, and it makes me to encourage other readers to do the same. Just because a book is different definitely doesn’t mean it’s author doesn’t share the same talent and writing style that you have always enjoyed.

So try something new!

 

He is Quite a Character

I suppose I need to discuss Augustus Waters. I think most of you know who this person is by now.  He is the love story that all of us want to have. He’s not cheesy, but romantic. He’s dynamic, but simple. All of us fall in love with Augustus right along with Hazel Grace.

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The Fault in Our Stars is one of those stories that breaks your heart into a million pieces, but makes you feel like you have be reborn after you turn that last page. A person that doesn’t read wouldn’t understand what this means. It is truly spectacular how the writer can do this to us readers. One has to think that the author is a cancer patient himself, and perhaps he is Augustus in this book. However, he isn’t. John Green has never had cancer and isn’t our friendly character after all. So how could he find the inspiration to write about what we read before our eyes?

Well many years ago I worked as a student chaplain at a children’s hospital, and I think it got lodged in my head then. The kids I met were funny and bright and angry and dark and just as human as anybody else. And I really wanted to try to capture that, I guess, and I felt that the stories that I was reading sort of oversimplified and sometimes even dehumanized them. And I think generally we have a habit of imagining the very sick or the dying as being kind of fundamentally other. I guess I wanted to argue for their humanity, their complete humanity.

So that was the initial inspiration.

That took 12 years. I was very intimidated by it.” -John Green

Quote citation: (read the full interview)   http://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2013/02/how-john-green-wrote-a-cancer-book-but-not-a-bullshit-cancer-book/273441/

Writer’s have a few talents that the average person do not, but the one that amazes me the most is the ability to view a situation (good or bad) and turn it into a piece of art. It is like taking a picture of an object and describing everything about it. A writer describes the situation and weaves his voice through the gaps.

If you are a parent and have read this I am sorry to say I do not know how to properly blog this book for you. First off I have to say that I would never recommend this book to my mother. I couldn’t put thoughts like that in her head, even though the book has one of the best stories I have read (not the best, I could never pick one single favorite story). I’m glad the writer didn’t emphasize too greatly on the parents’ pain in this book. I could never bare the thought of what these parents have to go through, and I think that’s one of the great things about this book that make it not like the others.

As Green says in his interview, he wanted to not oversimplify the characters in his book like he has witnessed in other stories that he has read. I think focusing on the parents after the death of Augustus would have oversimplified not his cancerous characters themselves but would have made it like any other book about this disease and its ability to destroy the worlds around it.

I have heard Hollywood wants to make a movie based on this book. I must say I really hope they don’t. I’m sure many can agree that Hollywood likes to take something great and completely kill it, but that is another post of its own. Please enjoy this great read before the movie comes out!

Until next time.

Thought for the day

Thought for the day

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St. Augustine was a bishop who’s writings were a primary influence of Western Christianity and Western Philosophy. I think there are many ways to interpret the meaning in his quote, but what is important to me is that St. Augustine is comparing traveling to books, but also books to traveling. The stories we read in books take us places we haven’t imagined ourselves, and the writer makes up for our lack of creativity. Now of course this is nothing against readers, we can’t all be as incredibly talented as writers are. If we were all as imaginative and creative as writers, would there be such thing as a good story anymore or would all stories be good? I think people being uncreative is what makes a good story.

Books are an adventure. They are a portal to many worlds, and those who do not step into the story do not travel the worlds that we do.

What do you think?

You read, for fun?

Well hello there,

Okay, I am here to blog about reading. No, I am not here to bore you to pieces.  I hope that I am not the only one out there that likes to read about people that don’t exist, people that do exist and people who could exist that do extraordinary things. To read is to look at the world through another point of view. Rather the book be fictional or a documentary the words you read are of the writer’s, and he was just nice enough to let you see what he is thinking. Or what he is dreaming. Or what he is hoping the world will become. Or what he is hoping never happens.

The thing about reading is, I could go on for pages about how the written word touches all of our lives everyday. Even if you aren’t into sitting on the couch for hours on end reading about someone who you will never meet. I assume that since you are reading this post that you do in fact like to read, so hopefully you feel exactly the same way I do about books and every other literary source that has been invented. The world is such an interesting place and it is meant to be seen with different opinions and points of views. However I am not by any means limiting it to only reading for the writer’s view of the world. There is so much you can examine about the reasons why people read that it could never be fully expressed just what reading and writing does for everyone. So let’s vaguely state it as entertaining and informational.

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What I want to bring to my viewers is great insight to what other people are thinking. I’m not the writer of the book you are reading I am the word spreader of the book you are reading. I want to explore what the writer is telling us and I want to see what other readers have come to think of it. My posts will be more than just book reviews. My viewers will see just what everyone thinks about E. L. James’ Fifty Shades of Grey and other booming books. I also want to explore with my viewers books and their movies, the history of books, children’s books, and even go into literature and poetry.

I will be creating a YouTube Channel to stream all my interviews for my questionnaires and I have also created a Pinterest board tied to my blog. I also have all my posts set up to publish to my Facebook wall and Twitter account. Anyone can definitely follow me on my other sites.

I hope my posts will spike a bigger interest for reading anything and everything for my viewers, because an unexamined world is not worth living in.